Why Use a Password Manager?

Why Use a Password Manager?

According to eMarketer, people in the US spend approximately 6 and a half hours online per day, and the world average is also similar to this number. This is a staggering number – you are on the web for more than quarter of your life. What this also means is that while you shop, pay your utility bills, or log in to any of your online services, you have to enter your user credentials, fill out forms, and so on. It’s a human thing to simplify things, so people often use the same username / password combination with different websites of services. And here lies the problem. 

Problem number 1: You can get hacked if you don’t use strong passwords

If you don’t use a password manager of any kind, you’ll want to use passwords which are easy to remember. Generally, these passwords are shorter, and are way easier to be hacked, or even guessed. The attacker than has access to your service, and can do anything with your account. And here lies the second problem:

Problem number 2: Reusing passwords is easy for you, but easy for hackers to get access to your other accounts.

If you are using one password across many online accounts, when one gets compromised, others are too, because usually hackers don’t stop at one account, and try your credentials with multiple sites and apps. For this reason, you’ll need a unique password for each and every online service you visit, so if one account gets hacked somehow, the rest is still safe. 

Problem number 3: Remembering Unique and strong passwords is hard

So let’s assume you are committed to security. You generate a strong and unique password for all your services (by the way, you can use this password generator too), but these are very hard to remember, to manage and to organize. Do you have a physical passbook? This can be stolen. Do you have a sticker on your laptop / desktop monitor? Don’t even think about it! Do you have it saved in your Google Drive? You know, if your google account gets hacked, all of your passwords are in the hands of the hacker. 

Using the browser's password manager and features of great password managers

For these reasons, more and more people start to use password managers. Some use their browser’s default password manager app, which does provide some degree of protection, but does nothing about compromised accounts and does not warn you necessarily about duplicate passwords, not to mention the fact  that their solution only works  (usually) in their browser environment. 

A Good Password Manager Should

Just to list a few essential things.

 

At Privacy Heaven, we have checked dozens and dozens of password managers, and have rated them in five distinct areas: 

Features – What kind of features does the password manager provide?

Security – What kind of encryption does it offer? Is it zero-knowledge? Has the Password Manager company been hacked? Are there any extra security features?

Ease of Use – Can you do what you want in the app quickly and efficiently? Do the features work as intended?

Price: Is it free, reasonable-priced or overpriced? 

Support – If you have a problem, can you contact support? If so, how? What is the response time? Are the responses helpful? Are there any FAQ-s or knowledge base on the website?

Based on these factors, we have a Top List of Password Managers, so you can be confident that you are well-informed if you want to download a password manager.  Currently, the top password manager we have tested is Dashlane, so if you want to start using a password manager, why not try them out?

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