Firefox Lockwise Review

FirefoX Lockwise ReviewMozilla has always been at the forefront of the safe internet experience. Firefox browser is one of the most popular web browsers in the world, but there are some additional Mozilla solutions which you might not know about. One of them is Firefox Lockwise, the new, cross platform password manager Mozilla developed from the browser’s own password manager. In this review, we’ll compare the app to market leaders like Dashlane, Roboform or LastPass, and see whether Mozilla lives up to its name.

Firefox Lockwise Features

Score: 63/100
Features 63%

We were also impressed with Mozilla’s efforts to make the web a safer ad better place, and it’s certainly commendable that they also came up with a standalone Password Manager app, which can be ‘taken anywhere’. However, regarding platform availability, we have some (mostly understandable) issues. Lockwise is natively integrated into the Firefox browser, and has apps for Android and iOS, You’ll have to use your Firefox account to use it. Also, you have to be logged in to at least 2 devices to make Lockwise active.

The main problem is the lack of standalone apps for Mac and PC, and more importantly, no extension for Chrome, Edge, Opera. While this is truly understandable, this means that users don’t get fully covered by Firefox Lockwise for all their devices and browsers.

The second problem is features:

While Lockwise serves as a good and secure password manager, it lacks extra and useful features other password managers have. For example if you are using the App, and not the firefox browser, form filling function does not exist. There is no secure storage built-in (although Mozilla has a Secure Send product, which is separate), and there is no native security checkup (Another product of Mozilla, separated from Lockwise). Our overall impression is that Lockwise currently is not much more useful as a standalone app then before, where it was integrated solely in the browser.  Other Password Managers (including Dashlane or Roboform) have features like secure storage, breach watch functions, form-filling, built-in VPN) all in their app.

Firefox Lockwise Review - Security

Score: 85/100
Security 85%

Firefox runs on a zero-knowledge model, and your passwords are encrypted withe AES-256-GCM encryption, this is pretty much the industry standard, it also uses PBKDF2 and HKDF with SHA-256 to secure your master password and username. The app and the browser has an integrated password generator, which is not as flexible as other providers similar solutions (e.g. Dashlane), it does the job, and it’s not intrusive. Lockwise does not have a continuous breach monitoring per se, but you can use Firefox Monitor to check whether your accounts are compromised through a data breach.

What is a huge plus with Lockwise is the following: Since it’s an open source software, everyone is free to inspect the code and look for vulnerabilities, and generally these software are considered to be more secure.This is something only very few password managers have (Bitwarden and Keepass).

Overall we would say that the security of Firefox Lockwise is decent.

Firefox Lockwise Review - Price

Score: 100/100
Price 100%

This is a very short section. Firefox Lockwise is free, and it will be free forever. That grants an automatic 100% rating!

Firefox Lockwise Review - Usability

Score: 80/100
Usability 80%

Since Firefox Lockwise is a fairly simple password manager app, the overall usability is decent, however we did experience some responsivity issues with app on Android and iOS as well. The main problem (as stated before), is that Lockwise is a barebone password manager, and password manager only.

Firefox Lockwise Review - Support

Score: 80/100
Usability 80%

Since Firefox Lockwise is a free product, you can’t expect phone or chat support, and email queries take a long time to be responded, however, due to the great Mozilla Community, you can easily use forums to get your answer. Our overall experience is mixed: You can’t expect fully-fledged support, and you won’t get any.

Firefox Lockwise - Final Verdict

Firefox Lockwise Result: 4.02/5
4/5
Features 63%
Security 85%
Price 100%
Usability 80%
Support 74%

Firefox is (by far) not the best password manager in the market. Granted, it is made by Mozilla, and since the product is fairly new in this form, we can expect some further developments, and true, if you are living in the Firefox ecosystem, it might be a good choice for you, but for everyone else, we suggest looking at our top password manager reviews.

Other Password Manager Reviews

Which Advanced Password Manager to use?

If you are looking for the password manager called ‘Advanced Password Manager’, please note that it has been audited by several companies, and classified as a potential unwanted software,  which usually comes bundled with other freeware downloaded. However, if you want to see some actual Advanced Password Managers, we have you covered!

Dashlane - Great Free version, Full of features, and VPN included with premium plans.

Dashlane is Privacy Heaven’s favourite password manager, and for good reason! It is a great password manager, but it has awesome features such as: 

 

Password Changer: It automatically changes your passwords when you request it with several sites and services

Dark Web Monitoring: This is a premium-only feature: What it does is basically constantly searching the web, and alerting you when your passwords or personal information is being used. This is extremely useful to be up-to-date with your personal security

VPN: Premium-only feature: Dashlane gives paying customers a fully-operational VPN, which is not the best VPN we’ve ever tried, but it certainly does the job. A very useful feature if you’re using a lot of unsecured Wi-fi hotspots, or want to hide your activity from your ISP. 

Emergency Contact: You can designate an emergency contact with Dashlane: this person is allowed to access your secrets when something happens to you. 

Automatic form filling: Do you hate filling out Forms? Dashlane can help you with that! No more time wasted.

Interested in checking Dashlane out? Good news is that it has a very decent free plan, so you can try this advanced password manager out and even get a month of premium trial (by the way, the free version will still work after the trial period.

Roboform - Advanced Form filling

Roboform logoRoboform by itself is a very decent password manager, but which makes it stand above the crowd is their super-advanced form-filling capabilities: You can really customize every data field. 

Other than that, there are a few noteworthy features: 

Offline-only storage: Although Roboform is a cloud password manager (like almost all password managers we’ve tested), they have an offline-only option for their desktop and mobile clients. 

Emergency Access feature is very similar to Dashlane’s solution. 

Bookmark management feature: Doing it is easy in a safe environment. 

Roboform is not as aesthetically pleasing as Dashlane, but provides great features for a very reasonable price. Want to give it a spin? Check out Roboform here!

LastPass - Great Features and aesthetically pleasing

LastPass is probably the most known password manager. It had its share of bad PR with its data breach incidents in 2015, but overall, LastPass is a great service with a lot of great features. 

What we particularly liked is the type of notes you can keep: From Drivers Licence to Social Security number, LastPass has several categories, but even if it’s not there, you can make your own customized secure note. 

Other than that, we really liked the following: 

Password Changer: Similar to Dashlane’s solution

The usability and layout of the mobile app: Dashlane is a bit better, but overall, it’s great!

Emergency contact: As described before, you can designate an emergency contant, if you’re not able to reach the service. 

Dark Web monitoring

If you’re interested in LastPass,  give it a try.

Other noteworthy Advanced Password Managers

Keeper for it’s overall very solid features and it’s patented Breachwatch feature

1password for it’s unique security features

NordPass for it’s very intuitive user interface and it’s new features coming out by the day 

Actually every password manager which are on our Best Password Manager roundup is advanced and secure, and all of them provide bulletproof encryption, password generators, password sharing and multiple device sync (at least in the paid tier), which are all necessary to stay in the game in this crowded space, but if you want to hear our opinion…

Overall recommendation for Advanced Password Manager

Based on our extensive research we found Dashlane to be the most advanced password manager (for now) – and that’s mainly because of the security, the added VPN, and the dark web scanning features. Give Dashlane a try to find it out yourself.

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Bitwarden VS LastPass

Bitwarden vs Lastpass - The tale of two worlds

Bitwarden and LastPass are both making waves in the Password Manager scene: Bitwarden is a relatively new, Open-source solution with a decent free and paid plan, while LastPass is one of the oldest players in the block with a very feature-rich but simple user interface. Let’s see how they battle it out. On thing to mention here: This article is a summary only, if you want to read the in-depth reviews, please check out our LastPass and Bitwarden reviews, where we talk about all these topics in-depth. If you want to check out which password manager we think is best of the dozens we tested, we suggest reading through this article. Anyway, let’s get it on! 

Round 1 - Availability

Devices and extensions

 

On Mobile, the slight edge goes to LastPass, because it still offers support for Windows phones, otherwise, both apps are available for Android and iOS. 

 

On Desktop: Both Bitwarden and LastPass has dedicated apps for PC and Mac, and a Linux option as well. This is a tie. 

 

Extensions: Bitwarden has a slight edge here, because it supports Brave and Vivaldi browsers as well (LastPass has support for Maxthon) , however, both both password managers have solutions for Chrome, Firefox, Explorer, Microsoft Edge and Opera.

 

Overall rating: this is a Tie between Bitwarden vs. LastPass.

Round 2 - Security

 Bitwarden has an open-source code, which is usually considered more secure than proprietary code (Like LastPass). Both of the apps have zero-knowledge implemented, and have AES-256 encryption, an industry standard. Both of these password managers are considered very secure, but LastPass had a security incident in 2015, so this round goes to BitWarden

Round 3 - Additional features

So far, in this Bitwarden Vs. LastPass fight, this is clearly a tie, however, if we look at additional features, we’ll clearly see that LastPass pulls ahead. Their Form filling and secure notes section is much more customizable and easier to use than Bitwarden’s, and they offer easy password sharing. The big plus in case of both Password Managers is Multi-account sync in the Free Plan. This round goes to LastPass.

Round 4 - Pricing

If we only look at free-tier offers, it’s LastPass which offers more features for no investment, but if we look at the paid plans, Bitwarden offers more budget-friendly deals, if we only look at the dollar value. This round is won by Bitwarden.

Round 5 - General Usability

In the final round, we’ve tested general day-to-day usability of both password managers: We’ve installed Bitwarden and LastPass on all our devices for a week each. Our impression is, that overall LastPass is more likeable on a day-to-day scenario than Bitwarden, maybe because it’s more accurate form-filling capabilities.

Bitwarden Vs. Lastpass - Final Verdict

Although both password managers are great by their own right, we found LastPass a bit superior, mainly on the field of additional features and usability. If you want to read a bit more about each, feel free to check out the following pages:

 

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Bitwarden Review

Bitwarden is getting traction in the Password Manager world, because they are Open Source, and their free product covers a lot of features. We’ll look at this Password Manager to see whether these statements are true, and if so, how do they stack up against Dashlane, Roboform, or LastPass. As usual, we’ll examine this software in 5 areas: Features, Security, Useability, Price and Support. Let’s see how this Bitwarden Review pans out:

Bitwarden's Features

Score: 90/100
Features 90%
Bitwarden Review : Password Generator
Bitwarden’s Password Generator is decent.

Bitwarden in its free plan is not a feature-rich password manager, only with one notable exception: Multi-device sync. This means that you can log in and see and manage your passwords across multiple devices, which is a feature that only LastPass provides in the free plan. Foregoing this, Bitwarden has a password generator, and it can help you keeping some secure notes and identities, unfortunately the password-hygiene related tools are barred behind the paid tier, only Data Breach Report is available for everyone (which is a very useful feature!) Exposed Passwords, Reused Passwords, Weak Passwords, Unsecured Websites reports can be all used in the Premium tier. If we look at this tier, for the price (We’ll get there later) it is a decent offer. 

About platforms: Bitwarden supports Windows, macOS and Linux natively on the desktop, and has dedicated browser addons for Google Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Microsoft Edge and Opera, along with Vivaldi, Brave and the Tor browser. This is very commendable  On Mobile you can download the app for your iOS or Android device, so there’s nothing to scoff at. 

Bitwarden Review: Security

Score: 90/100
Security 90%
Bitwarden Github Repo
Bitwarden’s Github Repository is free for all to check

There is a huge plus on Bitwarden’s side: It’s an open source software, and it’s public audit by Cure53. You can check out their source code on Github, and even look for possible vulnerabilities there. This all means that the makers of Bitwarden are very confident that their solution is super-secure, and it’s a brave step which not a lot of password manager software providers take.  

Regarding your data: The Vault is secured by the industry standard AES-256bit encryption. Also, BitWarden runs on a zero-knowledge model, this means that you, and only you know the contents of your account. However, if you don’t want to host your passwords in the cloud, Bitwarden has you covered, there is an exhaustive know-how on how to self-host your passwords with Bitwarden, and this is a huge plus, even though it requires technical knowledge to implement. 

Bitwarden Price

Score: 92/100
Price 92%

Bitwarden’s pricing model is very generous, but there is one thing that we didn’t like. Let’s check these out:

The Free Plan is obviously free, and covers all the basic password manager features (Multi-device sync, Unlimited password storage, Password Generator, basic 2-factor authentication). However, if you want to try out the premium features, you have to sign up and pay in advance, there is no trial period. We think that this is something Bitwarden should change in the future, even though their Paid plan is very cheap. 

Personal Paid Plan: for $10 per year, You’ll get a lot of extra features, including the beforementoined Vault Health Reports,  Yubikey, U2F or Duo, 1 GByte of secure storage. What we miss is a password share option, and emergency contact addons. Then again, we can’t really complain because of the price. 

Family plan: for $12 per year, you’ll have premium features (with the exception of advanced 2FA) for 5 users, plus unlimited shared items.This is a very generous price indeed. 

For Businesses there are 2 options available: Teams and Enterprise for $2 and $3 per user per month respectively. What is strange is that premium features are ‘addon’ in case of the teams subscription, and even the prices are not so great, there are several other password managers which have better pricing for businesses. 

 

Usability of Bitwarden

Score: 82/100
Usability 82%

It’s a mixed bag. The initial setup is more cumbersome, especially when compared to the best 3 password managers, and if you have some passwords to import, but when it’s done, Bitwarden works as intended. The password generator is great, there is no great password-changer option, and you can access your notes or identities easily. We would say that it hits the industry standard average, but there are some issues with form-filling (bitwarden calls these identities), it was very inaccurate in a number of times. Credit card filling works great though. 

Support at Bitwarden

Score: 90/100
Support 90%

It’s not ideal, to say the least. There is no chat or phone support, free-tier users can only write emails to Bitwarden, and the response time is not great (2-3 days in our 2 tests). On the bright side, there is a very exhaustive help center available, and there is a forum available, and it has a relatively decent activity as well. Premium VIP support also has it’s lags, but the answers we got our answers in approximately 1 working day.  Overall we would say that Bitwarden support is not on par with the industry leaders. 



Bitwarden Review - Final Verdict

Bitwarden Result: 4.30/5
4.3/5
Features 90%
Security 90%
Price 92%
Usability 82%
Support 76%

We have mixed feelings about Bitwarden. On the plus side, it is great that even the free plan contains multi-device sync, and the security is top notch. On the negatives we can say that support is not the best, and there are some usability-issues, especially regarding imports and form-filling. Bitwarden is also missing some of the cool features other password managers have (like the built-in VPN of Dashlane, or easy password sharing in case of LastPass). We also miss the trial period for the Premium product. Overall, we would say that Bitwarden is a decent password manager, if you’re looking for a free one (although not the best), but we would choose something else if we would like a well-rounded password manager. 

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Why Use a Password Manager?

Why Use a Password Manager?

According to eMarketer, people in the US spend approximately 6 and a half hours online per day, and the world average is also similar to this number. This is a staggering number – you are on the web for more than quarter of your life. What this also means is that while you shop, pay your utility bills, or log in to any of your online services, you have to enter your user credentials, fill out forms, and so on. It’s a human thing to simplify things, so people often use the same username / password combination with different websites of services. And here lies the problem. 

Problem number 1: You can get hacked if you don’t use strong passwords

If you don’t use a password manager of any kind, you’ll want to use passwords which are easy to remember. Generally, these passwords are shorter, and are way easier to be hacked, or even guessed. The attacker than has access to your service, and can do anything with your account. And here lies the second problem:

Problem number 2: Reusing passwords is easy for you, but easy for hackers to get access to your other accounts.

If you are using one password across many online accounts, when one gets compromised, others are too, because usually hackers don’t stop at one account, and try your credentials with multiple sites and apps. For this reason, you’ll need a unique password for each and every online service you visit, so if one account gets hacked somehow, the rest is still safe. 

Problem number 3: Remembering Unique and strong passwords is hard

So let’s assume you are committed to security. You generate a strong and unique password for all your services (by the way, you can use this password generator too), but these are very hard to remember, to manage and to organize. Do you have a physical passbook? This can be stolen. Do you have a sticker on your laptop / desktop monitor? Don’t even think about it! Do you have it saved in your Google Drive? You know, if your google account gets hacked, all of your passwords are in the hands of the hacker. 

Using the browser's password manager and features of great password managers

For these reasons, more and more people start to use password managers. Some use their browser’s default password manager app, which does provide some degree of protection, but does nothing about compromised accounts and does not warn you necessarily about duplicate passwords, not to mention the fact  that their solution only works  (usually) in their browser environment. 

A Good Password Manager Should

Just to list a few essential things.

 

At Privacy Heaven, we have checked dozens and dozens of password managers, and have rated them in five distinct areas: 

Features – What kind of features does the password manager provide?

Security – What kind of encryption does it offer? Is it zero-knowledge? Has the Password Manager company been hacked? Are there any extra security features?

Ease of Use – Can you do what you want in the app quickly and efficiently? Do the features work as intended?

Price: Is it free, reasonable-priced or overpriced? 

Support – If you have a problem, can you contact support? If so, how? What is the response time? Are the responses helpful? Are there any FAQ-s or knowledge base on the website?

Based on these factors, we have a Top List of Password Managers, so you can be confident that you are well-informed if you want to download a password manager.  Currently, the top password manager we have tested is Dashlane, so if you want to start using a password manager, why not try them out?

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